Tuesday, May 26, 2020

M__TM___RE: "when Modigliani was"



Many thanks to Kiefer Logan, editor/publisher :: where is the river :: a poetry experiment.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Ever watch THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH with subtitles on?



Ground Control to honored to have a poem in the newest issue of Cover Magazine. Huge thanks to editors Hanna Shea and Ryan Jeffrey Shea.

Thursday, January 02, 2020

backstage at the submission apparition exhibition

2019: 5 poetry acceptances + 34 rejections received; 1 work promotion + well, I got engaged, planned a wedding and done got married!
2018: 3 poetry acceptances + 1 fiction acceptance + 43 rejections received; (1 work promotion) + 1 Pushcart nomination!
2017: 10 acceptances + 50 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2016: 11 acceptances + 53 rejections received;
2015: 12 acceptances + 88 (54/34) rejections received;
2014: 9 acceptances + 31 rejections received;
2013: 12 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2012: 12 acceptances + 39 rejections received;
2011: 16 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2010: 22 acceptances + 52 rejections received;
2009: 23 acceptances + 51 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2008: 25 acceptances + 73 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2007: 17 acceptances + 71 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2006: 9 acceptances + 28 rejections received


Tuesday, November 05, 2019

"The result is spectacular." Anne-Adele Wight reviews Take Out Delivery in Boog City #132



Boog City #132

“Like a waterwheel ablaze, everything is of the hunt, voracious.” The poems in Take Out Delivery burst at the seams with food, with the devouring of food, with the insatiable consumption of pop culture. Paul Siegell dishes out pizza, fortune cookies, Campbell’s soup, pasta, eggplant, tapioca, cassava, and Philly soft pretzels––all in the first eight pages. Even the title turns our minds toward dinner: what to get? where? how? The poem titles, each beginning, “We’ve Come for Your...,” remind us that we don’t live at the top of the food chain.

This book is a hybrid, a cross-genre work with its home in the 21st century. Groups of poems alternate with clusters of cartoons featuring the hot pepper people. Ingeniously assembled by an off-label use of punctuation marks, these beings have the genetic characteristics of Siegell’s earlier punctuation cartoons, but here they strut with special flamboyance. While “tightening up their grooviest of shoelaces,” one queries, “chaos cicada?”; the other replies, “impulse octopus!”

Always generous, Siegell agreed to let me interview him. When asked, “Who is the ‘we’ of the poem titles?”, he replied, “The hot pepper people.” They turn out to have names: Hemingway, Gorbachev, Tug McGraw, Rachmaninoff, Catherine the Great, Leonardo diCaprio, Cleopatra, and many more. Throughout the poems we find the names of famous people, public figures who traded privacy for immortality and whose names have contributed to defining pop, and not-so-pop, culture. Siegell says, “I spent my childhood watching MTV,” a medium in which everything has its defining name and its distinctive brand.

Wordplay drives the activities of the hot pepper people. Siegell describes his creative process: “It’s really hard for me not to play.” His strongest imperative is to sign his work by making it uniquely his. If he can’t say definitively, “This is mine,” he isn’t satisfied. Once he realized that “proper nouns were going to take the weight of this book,” the visual element became essential and the cartoons found their place. Throw in one more character, Jay Uxtapo, who personifies creative juxtaposition, and we’re off, circling in a vortex from which we emerge dizzy but well fed.

The recurring theme of a scavenger hunt unifies most of the poems. Jay Uxtapo presents “Pterodactyl scavenger hunt,” “Stark raving mad scavenger hunt,” “Manna from heaven scavenger hunt,” and many more. Siegell points out a subtle detail: in a clever use of assonance, each scavenger hunt is associated with another short “a” sound, which underlines the phrase.

For all its hyperactive scavenger hunts, Take Out Delivery is no bag of popcorn. About a quarter of the way in, Siegell realized he needed a serious theme to give the book more heft. Pop culture has its grim side, notably the 9/11 attacks. A line at the bottom of the copyright page clues the reader in to what’s coming: “Lucky numbers ∙ 9, 11, 9, 11, 9, 1, 11.” The first cartoon appears on page 9, followed by the first poem on page 11. Divided by cartoons, the poems occur in alternating groups of nine and eleven. Between the last two groups, a lone poem, “We’ve Come for Your Pause Button,” begins, “’Fire and smoke engulf the towers of the World.’” There follows “One of the saddest scavenger hunts ever imagined.” The 9/11 section brings a radical shift of pattern, rhythm, and tone. Siegell slams on the brakes in this moment of honoring the dead. Two empty squares, facing each other and each alone on its page, could look like brake pedals but represent something far sadder: the footprints of the fallen Twin Towers.

Under the calliope music a funeral march plays. For any American, references to 9/11 bring up the precariousness of survival. We comfort and distract ourselves with too much work, too much noise, excessive consumption. The book’s “moment of silence,” as Siegell describes it, forces a sudden examination of our fears.
In “We’ve Come for Your Train Conductor Hole Puncher,” a poem preceding the 9/11 section, Siegell drops one more hint by multiplying 111,111,111 x 111,111,111. This calculation involves 18 ones, or (you guessed it) 9 elevens. The result is spectacular.

––Anne-Adele Wight

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

"Coming Up 10th" in Every Pigeon

nice news: honored to have a chill little poem in the newest (& final) issue of Every Pigeon. huge thanks to Jubalee Penuliar and the rest of the generous editors.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Billy Penn calls my work "newly spicy" and "relatively brash"

In their post about The Philadelphia Inquirer's 190th birthday and switch from Philly.com to Inquirer.com, WHYY’s Billy Penn writes:

One of the three oldest surviving print publications in the country, The Philadelphia Inquirer was founded in June 1829 by John R. Walker and John Norvell. The latter man is the source of the paper’s moniker, which comes from this quote:

In a free state, there should always be an inquirer asking on behalf of the people.”

That motto informs a newly spicy tagline for the rebranded company. Answering the question of why “an Inquirer” seeks out information, it uses a phrase that’s relatively brash for the once-staid periodical: “Because they give a damn.”



The tone shift was entirely on purpose, per Parzych, who said it was intended to catch people’s attention and also “infuse some of the proud DNA” of the Daily News into the combined brand.

“Internally, it’s made people excited because, you know, we do give a damn. Philadelphia gives a damn, right?” she said. “We were really trying to encapsulate the passion that is Philadelphia.”

Wednesday, June 05, 2019

*UNDERSTANDING ADVERTISING* in PROLIT: A LITERARY MAGAZINE ABOUT MONEY, WORK, & CLASS



My lit is pro Prolit Magazine 🕺🏻🥂🚀 Many thanks to Patrick Blagrave and all his incredible work launching this new, important journal. Honored to help kick it off and be among such inspiring company!

Wednesday, January 02, 2019

backstage at the submission apparition exhibition

2018: 3 poetry acceptances + 1 fiction acceptance + 43 rejections received; (1 work promotion) + 1 Pushcart nomination!
2017: 10 acceptances + 50 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2016: 11 acceptances + 53 rejections received;
2015: 12 acceptances + 88 (54/34) rejections received;
2014: 9 acceptances + 31 rejections received;
2013: 12 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2012: 12 acceptances + 39 rejections received;
2011: 16 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2010: 22 acceptances + 52 rejections received;
2009: 23 acceptances + 51 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2008: 25 acceptances + 73 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2007: 17 acceptances + 71 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2006: 9 acceptances + 28 rejections received


Monday, July 16, 2018

I'M WITH STUPID


MAINTENANT 12: A JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY DADA WRITING AND ART (Three Rooms Press, 2018), features work that explores the theme “We Are All A ‘Like.'” With the rise in social media use—and abuse—the concept of “like” has reached whole new levels. There’s the idea of an individual’s reaction to events, people, images, etc. as a reduction to “Like” or “Dislike” without need for deeper consideration. Then there is the status factor: that something which is “Liked” by the largest number of people is of value. The concept, while simple, has innumerable ways of looking at it.

Cover by MacArthur Fellow artist Nicole Eisenman. Inside, the work of nearly 200 artists and writers from six continents storms the pages.

Monday, July 02, 2018

VIDEO: "Stay quirky, my friends!"

*** speakers up / click to play *** Well, Friday’s book release was pretty much the most unreal night I’ve had in a long time. Thank you all – so much – for making it truly extraordinary. It was a total love fest and I'm still basking! Everyone’s support has been beyond incredible.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

TAKE OUT DELIVERY: the book release party

Friends! You're invited! Take Out Delivery: Poems & Comics
was recently published and I’m throwing it a launch party.

Facebook: FRIDAY, JUNE 22 @ L’Etage (624 S 6th St)


Featuring thrills:
~ Kim Gek-Lin Short
~ Kevin Varrone
~ Quincy R. Lehr
~ Angel Hogan
~ Julia Bloch
~ Ernest Hilbert
~ Tamara Oakman
& Paul Siegell

Hosted by Painted Bride Quarterly’s Kathleen Volk Miller

Doors 7 / Readings 7:45ish / Love ∞


Wednesday, June 06, 2018

SONG: "The Next Dalai Lama" by Paul Siegell

speakers up / click to play:
“Extra extra: this affects ya. It’s comin’ atcha. Straight for you.
You betcha. To inform you. And protect you. And connect you.”

Monday, March 12, 2018

THE BOOK TRAILER

coming soon: Music: "Tim on the Spooky" by Loud Julia

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Library of Congress'd



backstage at the submission apparition exhibition

2017: 10 acceptances + 50 rejections received; 1 book accepted!
2016: 11 acceptances + 53 rejections received;
2015: 12 acceptances + 88 (54/34) rejections received;
2014: 9 acceptances + 31 rejections received;
2013: 12 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2012: 12 acceptances + 39 rejections received;
2011: 16 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2010: 22 acceptances + 52 rejections received;
2009: 23 acceptances + 51 rejections received;
2008: 25 acceptances + 73 rejections received;
2007: 17 acceptances + 71 rejections received;
2006: 9 acceptances + 28 rejections received


Friday, December 15, 2017

*GABRIEL*


NEW POEM WITH AUDIO: *GABRIEL* in the CLEAVER: Philadelphia's International Literary Magazine. Issue No. 20.
Also featured on Cleaver Radio’s On The Edge. Many thanks
to the editors.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Spuyten Duyvil is a Bronx neighborhood. "Spuyten Duyvil" [Dutch] means "Spouting Devil." Spuyten Duyvil Press was born in 1982, near Columbia University, by poet/novelist M.G. Stephens. And then later expanded by T. Thilleman in the '90s.

Dear Paul,

Take Out Delivery plunges, playful, punful into the cheeky contem-poetics via poemics and plumbing the sonic underbelly of collective unconsciousness. "Lip locked to hip hop", "achingly rhythmic" scrawl about the base, the beat. Surreal submerge in subconscious cultural cream. Head-under-water bobbing for apples you know will taste juicy
as solitary sudden revelations of communal hear, now: "hot pepper people performing the sitar ritual over the relic of self." Bits of true dialogue glimmer like flashes seen out of eye corner. Culture hoarder. "Dark matter scavenger hunt." Dumpster diving for treasure, truth. The image shakes itself out of the eaves, startling, unfurling: "Most of those being found are dead--" These poems writhe and meaning writes itself in a slip-slide as images bleed blend and build into hot chili peppered wonders we never thought possible till your musical body wrung them out for us, in comic color.

Needless to proclaim, the SD team utterly adores your work and would love to publish Take Out Delivery!

[...]

Bright summer dregs,
Aurelia
Editor
Spuyten Duyvil Publishing

Thursday, June 08, 2017

M__TM___RE (83) | M__TM___RE (143)


Two "M__TM___RE" poems alongside beautiful work from CAConrad, Shane Book, Sueyeun Juliette Lee, Tessa Micaela, Dorothea Lasky, and so many others. Thanks so much to all at Berkeley Poetry Review!

(83) works with Apollinaire & Picasso, (143) Montmartre & cubism.

Source material for the M__TM___RE poems: Bohemian Paris: Picasso, Modigliani, Matisse, and the Birth of Modern Art by Dan Franck (Grove Press, 2003). Poems from M__TM___RE have thus far appeared in American Poetry Review, Berkeley Poetry Review, Festival Writer, inter|rupture, littletell, Masque & Spectacle, Otoliths, and Really System.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

IT WAS WRITTEN: POETRY INSPIRED BY HIP-HOP

Honored to have my b-girl/breakdancer poem (page 18) and writing prompt (page 199) included! IT WAS WRITTEN. POETRY INSPIRED BY HIP-HOP. Edited by Jason McCall & P.J. Williams.

inter|rupture #19: "this way; had shattered"

Many thanks to Editors Curtis Perdue, Elizabeth Onusko and Anna Pollock-Nelson. Issue #19 features selections from M__TM___RE!

Really System serves up some Jacques Lipchitz

Many thanks, again, to editor Patrick Williams! Three selections from Jacques Lipchitz in Issue #12: Slyly as Meter.

Tuesday, January 03, 2017

backstage at the submission apparition exhibition

2016: 11 acceptances + 53 rejections received;
2015: 12 acceptances + 88 rejections received;
2014: 9 acceptances + 31 rejections received;
2013: 12 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2012: 12 acceptances + 39 rejections received;
2011: 16 acceptances + 37 rejections received;
2010: 22 acceptances + 52 rejections received;
2009: 23 acceptances + 51 rejections received;
2008: 25 acceptances + 73 rejections received;
2007: 17 acceptances + 71 rejections received;
2006: 9 acceptances + 28 rejections received

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

AMERICAN POETRY REVIEW: five poems



Previously in APR: "acrobatic macaroni, or at a music-boiled battle scene" & "BIG TIME" (Winner of the Goodreads Poetry Contest, May 2010). Many thanks to Elizabeth Scanlon and all of the APR editors.

And, thanks for the shout-out from Painted Bride Quarterly!

Thursday, September 15, 2016

*ADMIT ONE (OR, THE TROMBONE POEM)*



Big thanks to Poetry Editor Kari O’Connor and the rest of the Helen editors for publishing *ADMIT ONE (OR, THE TROMBONE POEM)*. Means a lot to me. Now, who's got my Trombone Shorty tickets?

Thursday, August 25, 2016

"LOOKING AT LIFE THRU THE SPECTRAL ARCHITEXTUAL"

Jacques Lipchitz rides again! Many thanks to Taleen Kali and the rest of the DUM DUM Zine staff.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

"blood through the depths of instinctual beast self"



*QWERTY OWL: ON THE WRITING OF THE WRITTEN OBJECT* originally published in Sprung Formal #11. Many thanks to Jordan Stempleman and Janie Marino. Mosaic Murals by Isaiah Zagar, Phila.

Tuesday, June 07, 2016

MASQUE & SPECTACLE is a quarterly arts and literary journal. And it has three poem from "M__TM___RE"



Tremendous thanks to Heather Momyer, editor of Masque & Spectacle.

Source material: Bohemian Paris: Picasso, Modigliani, Matisse, and the Birth of Modern Art by Dan Franck (Grove Press, 2003).

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

QWERTY OWL: ON THE WRITING OF THE WRITTEN OBJECT



Tremendous thanks to Jordan Stempleman, Janie Marino, and all of the editors of Sprung Formal #11.

Monday, March 21, 2016

GO HOME, APRIL -- YOU'RE DRUNK

* [Sat 04.02.16]: Leading a Workshop:
Forgotten Voices Poetry Group at Telford Library, Telford, PA

1:oopm – why orderly type they energy any

Writing poetry can be a pretty difficult thing to do, but it can also be a lot of fun. So let’s do just that! And let’s get granular. Let’s go i-n-s-i-d-e the wonderful words we chose and use, and take a look at the letters that get us where we never knew we could go.
* [Mon 04.11.16]: Hosting a Reading:
1:oopm – Painted Bride Quarterly presents: Four Dope Poets at Black Sheep Pub, Phila, PA: details to come
* [Sat 04.16.16]: Moderating a Panel:
Philly Loves Poetry Festival, Art Sanctuary, Phila, PA

12:00pm-1:30pm – Power Chords: Music & Poetry

To some poets, music is a major part of their work – both in process and in content – because music is a major part of who they are. Come hang with a few local poets as they discuss how songs, instruments, beats, musicians, and genres of music impact the writing, reading, and performance of poetry. Paul Siegell (moderator) with Kirsten Kaschock, Camae Defstar, and Ernest Hilbert
* [Thurs 04.21.16]: Judged a Recognition:
PA Center for the Book’s Public Poetry Project with Nicole Steinberg, Dawn Lonsinger, Peter Oresick, Michelle Lin, and Tameka Cage Conley, Foster Auditorium in Paterno Library, State College, PA
* [Sat 04.30.16]: Presenting on a Panel:
LitLife Poetry Conference, Rosemont College's Lawrence Auditorium, Phila, PA

Panelists: Dr. Valerie Fox (moderator), Kelly McQuain, Paul Siegell, and Catherine Staples.

Fantastic Ekphrastic: What is poetry's relationship to other art forms? An ekphrastic poem is a vivid description of a work of art, but the idea of ekphrasis need not stop there. What are some of the new ways in which Philly poets are combining poetry projects with visual art, dance, portraiture and other hybrid creations? What role can concrete poetry play? What are good starting points for writers wishing to tackle art as a subject area, and how can one best collaborate with contemporary peers as well as artists of ages past? Join these Philly poets to see how they infuse their poems and poetics through collaboration with art via multiple modes.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

"MY BLOCKS HAD SPILLED ALL OVER THE LINOLEUM"

Thanks to Zachary Cosby, 13 spreads from my manuscript, JACQUES LIPCHITZ, is the first post to appear on Fog Machine in 2016!



Created entirely in the lo-fi of Microsoft Word, JACQUES LIPCHITZ
is a book-length visual expression of creative history. Inside you’ll find typographical recreations of the artist’s sculptural biography, and where appropriate, some of my story as well. Inside you’ll find.

Please click the pic for more!

Other selections from this effort: Damask Press, E-Verse Radio, On Barcelona, Otoliths, Switchback, Word For/Word, and at the Bridgette Mayer Gallery’s benefit for BalletX (2014).

Tuesday, January 05, 2016

Petite Hound Press #23: "It’s 1 a.m. and I am deleting the death of a poet."



Editors’ Note | Letisia Cruz & Heather Lang: “So, while we’ll leave the music to the musicians and the science to the scientists,
we’ve paired Paul Siegell’s poem with Graham Francois visual
art to create an issue that at first glance reminds us of a page from
a children’s book
.”

*WE’VE COME FOR YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE*
“All I can do is be me, whoever that is." —Bob Dylan
That these, these aren’t even the things I care about the most.
It’s 1 a.m. and I am deleting the death of a poet. Sky burial 5.
What else would I be doing if I just didn’t show up for work?
I can see Orion taking aim. St. Sebastian scavenger hunt. On
a walk around the monument today: caged in scaffolding: all
its points of departure: Eve balancing an apple upon her head
while William Tell quarrels Cupid: It is a study in Rayonism.
It is a study in the sting our cash registers supply by opening.

Tuesday, December 01, 2015

When I say, "DEBAUCHERY!" you say, "WHY?"


About the night: PBQ welcomed guests to the season of excess in the red velvet splendor of Café Bardot, and presented Paul Lisicky, Catie Rosemurgy, Kirsten Kaschock, Chris McCreary, Cynthia Oka, Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela, and Paul Siegell. Hosted by Kathy Volk-Miller.